Liver-Friendly Diet

The following diet is based on the original one by Dr. Jean Dodds and I'm pleased that Dr. Dodds has approved it for long term use. Please note that the amounts of food have changed from the original diet and supplementation differs greatly. This diet meets the newest NRC recommended allowances for vitamins and minerals.

We can't expect to see positive results unless the diet is followed as written below. One of the best things about this diet is that you can purchase supplements that are well suited to your dog rather than a blend of things that may upset the gastrointestinal tract. For instance, if zinc citrate is not well tolerated, zinc gluconate can be used. If one manufacturer's B-Complex isn't suitable, there are many others available.

This diet has always been positioned to provide dogs with seizure disorders a source of branch chain amino acids and extremely low amounts of glutamate-aspartate. Since these dogs take medication(s) that can be hard on the liver, the diet is liver-friendly. However, it is not “just” a liver-friendly diet. It aims to serve a greater role, thus it restricts some foods. This diet has also been successfully fed to dogs that do not have seizures.

Recipe Per Week:

42 oz cod, baked

35 oz potato

42 oz sweet potato

21 oz zucchini

42 oz green beans

1 capsule vitamin E 200 IU

25 mg vitamin B compound

250 mg Ester-C

1 ½ eggshells

7 tsp. canola oil (not to be used for dogs that have seizures)

40 mg zinc citrate or gluconate

1 ¼ tsp di-calcium phosphate

3 capsules, Multimineral Complex

This diet should support the weight of a 25-30-pound dog. It provides approximately 678 kilocalories per day. Protein: 49 grams Carbohydrates: 85 grams Fat: 7.5 grams

Copyright Jan. 2007, Monica Segal

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